Posted On: January 29, 2010

RESPA: UPDATED RESPA RULE FAQs RELEASED ON JAN. 28, 2010

The U.S. Housing and Urban Development's Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) Division released new updated FAQs on Jan. 28, 2010. The new RESPA frequently asked updated question and answers (FAQs) are in bold.

One of the new questions asks whether a loan originator can require the use of its affiliate company for the tax or flood certificate. The updated RESPA guidance says that the loan originator may not require the use of its affiliate for the tax service or flood certificate, but a loan originator may require the use of a non-affiliated provider.

Posted On: January 21, 2010

RESPA REFORM QUESTION: WHERE DOES THE SELLER PAID TRANSFER TAX CHARGE ON THE HUD-1 AND GOOD FAITH ESTIMATE (GFE) GO?

Three weeks have gone by since the new RESPA Regulations went into effect and the most commonly asked question we have encountered thus far is how are Seller Paid Transfer Tax Charges shown.

The Frequently Asked Questions "FAQs" state that "All charges typically paid by the borrower must be disclosed on the Good Faith Estimate regardless of whether the charges will be paid by the borrower, seller, or other party?" The FAQ under Section 4 & 5 (see pages 34 & 35): Right to Cure Tolerance Violations has caused a great deal of confusion in some areas of the country on the issue of where to put the transfer tax fee. The confusion centers on whether the transfer tax fee has to be disclosed on the borrower's Good Faith Estimate even if the seller is paying for 100% of the transfer tax.

In some areas of the United States the local custom or tradition in a real estate closing has been to make the seller pay for the entire or a portion of the transfer tax or there is language in the real estate contract stating the seller is to pay for all or part of the transfer tax.

The answer is if the seller is paying for the entire transfer tax or a portion of the transfer tax then it must be listed on the borrower's Good Faith Estimate (GFE) and must be shown on the HUD-1 on the borrower's charge column on page 2 of the HUD-1 settlement statement. A credit may be given from the seller to the borrower on page 1 of the HUD-1 to offset the charge. The only exception to this is if state or local law requires the seller pay for the transfer tax. If state law or local law specifically requires the seller to pay all or a portion of the transfer tax then that portion was not required to be on the Good Faith Estimate.

Please remember though that a transfer tax, unless state or local law requires that it be paid by the seller, is a zero tolerance charge and must be disclosed on the borrower's GFE and on the HUD-1. It should also be noted that a lender may overestimate the transfer tax charge as reductions are not considered tolerance violations under the new RESPA guidelines.

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